July 28, 2019 12:00 PM PT

Chase Routing Number: What You Need to Know

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What is Chase Bank's routing number? Depends on the state. Find the right one for your account with our guide.

Routing numbers are 9-digit numbers that banks use to identify themselves. Think of them as addresses that allow other banks to find your money.

You need your routing number for many tasks, including:

  • ACH payments

  • Setting up direct deposit

  • Receiving benefits from the government, including tax refunds

  • Transferring money between accounts at different banks or investment firms

  • Automatic bill payment

  • Domestic wire transfers

Chase has branches throughout the United States and uses different routing numbers for different regions. Keep reading to learn how to find the right routing number for your transactions.

Chase savings accounts use the same routing numbers as checking accounts.

Chase Routing Numbers by State

Your Chase routing number is associated with the location of the bank where you opened your account. Even if you bank at another Chase branch, what matters is the bank where you originally opened your account.

Here are the Chase routing numbers by state:

StateRouting Number
Arizona122100024
California322271627
Colorado102001017
Connecticut21100361
Florida267084131
Georgia61092387
Idaho123271978
Illinois71000013
Indiana74000010
Kentucky83000137
Louisiana65400137
Michigan72000326
Nevada322271627
New Jersey21202337
New York—Downstate21000021
New York—Upstate22300173
Ohio44000037
Oklahoma103000648
Oregon325070760
Texas111000614
Utah124001545
Washington325070760
West Virginia51900366
Wisconsin75000019

If you don't see your region listed or you're unsure where you opened your account, there are other ways to find your Chase routing number. Read on.

Breaking Down Your Routing Number
The first four digits pertain to the Federal Reserve. The next four digits are unique to your bank. Consider those the bank's address for the Federal Reserve. The final digit is a mathematical calculation of the first eight digits—it's used to prevent check fraud.

Other Ways to Find Your Chase Routing Number

Use a Check
For checking accounts, you can find the routing number in the lower left-hand corner of the checks corresponding with your checking account. It's the first 9 digits located at the bottom of the check.

Go Online
After logging into your account, click the last four digits of your account number that appear above your account information. Your routing number will appear above your account information.

You can also use search at the top of the screen "routing number" to find the correct routing number for your account.

Call Customer Service
As a last resort, if you don't have online checking or a check handy, call Chase at 800-935-9935. After you provide a few details to identify yourself, a representative will be able to confirm your account's routing number.

Routing Numbers for Domestic/International Wire Transfers

Wire transfers are a faster way to send money than an ACH transfer. Chase typically charges a small fee.

In order to wire funds, you'll need to register for an online account with your Chase account. Here's how:

  1. In your online banking portal, click on the "Pay and Transfers" tab.

  2. Select "Wire money."

  3. You'll be prompted to add a wire recipient and other information.

Chase Wire Transfer Fees:

Incoming/OutgoingFee
Incoming (Domestic)$15.00
Outgoing (Domestic) done online$25.00
Outgoing (Domestic) done at a Chase branch$30.00
Incoming (International)$15.00
Outgoing (International) done online$40.00
Outgoing (International) done at a Chase branch$45.00

To Make a Domestic Wire Transfer (Within the US):
Chase uses a separate routing number different for these transfers. Use the JP Morgan Chase routing number 021000021 instead.

You'll also need:

  • The name of the person to whom you're wiring funds (the "beneficiary") as it appears on their account

  • The name and address of the beneficiary's bank

  • The beneficiary's account and routing number

Before submitting a wire transfer for processing, double-check that you have all the necessary information entered correctly.

To Make an International Transfer:
Use the Chase SWIFT code CHASUS33.

SWIFT (Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication) codes are the international equivalents of the US routing numbers. They direct the money to the correct bank for international transfers.

You'll also need the following information:

  • The name of the person to whom you're wiring funds ("the beneficiary") as it appears on their account

  • The name and address of the beneficiary's bank

  • The beneficiary's account number

  • The SWIFT Code of your bank and the bank you are sending to

  • Currency being sent

If you use Chase's foreign exchange rate service for a foreign currency wire transfer, wires for $5,000 or more are free (you'll only pay $5 for wires less than $5,000).

However, the foreign exchange rates Chase charge include a spread, commission, and vary depending on your customer relationship. According to their website, "You should expect that these rates will be less favorable than rates quoted online or in publications."

In other words, Chase's exchange rate service might end up costing you more than paying the wire transfer fee.

Which Chase Routing Number Should You Use?

For Any Domestic Money Transfer Activity:
Use the ABA routing number for the state where you opened your Chase account.

For Any Domestic Wire Transfers
Use the JP Morgan Chase wire transfer routing number 021000021.

For International Wire Transfers:
Use Chase SWIFT code CHASUS33.

Is There a Routing Number on Your Debit or Credit Card?
Although your debit card is associated with a bank account, you do not use a routing number for debit card transactions. Routing numbers are only used for transfers directly between bank accounts.

Likewise, credit cards do not have routing numbers since they are not directly linked to any bank account. When you pay your credit card online, you may need to use your bank account routing number to set up the link between your credit card account and checking account, like you would for any other bill.

Bottom Line

You'll likely need your Chase routing number when managing your finances. Keep it handy should you need to set up a direct deposit, automatic payment, or wire transfer.

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are author's alone. Please support CreditDonkey on our mission to help you make savvy decisions. Our free online service is made possible through financial relationships with some of the products and services mentioned on this site. We may receive compensation if you shop through links in our content.

Disclaimer: This content was first published on July 28, 2019. Information including rates, fees, terms and benefits may vary, be out of date, or not applicable to you. Information is provided without warranty. Please check the bank's website for updated information.

More from CreditDonkey:


What is a Routing Number


How to Transfer Money from One Bank to Another


Chase Bank Review

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