September 29, 2019

Bank of America Routing Number

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To transfer money in or out of your Bank of America checking or savings account, you'll need the right routing number. Find your Bank of America routing number and learn more about money transfers in our guide.

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Routing numbers are 9-digit numbers that banks use to identify themselves. Think of them as addresses that let other banks know where to find your money.

You need your routing number for many tasks, including:

  • ACH payments

  • Setting up direct deposit

  • Receiving benefits from the government, including tax refunds

  • Transferring money between accounts at different banks or investment firms

  • Automatic bill payment

  • Domestic wire transfers

Bank of America has branches throughout the United States and uses different routing numbers for different states and regions. Keep reading to find the right routing number for your transactions.

Bank of America savings accounts use the same routing numbers as checking accounts. However, some regions use different routing numbers for electronic transfers like ACH payments and paper transfers like ordering checks.

Bank of America Routing Numbers by State

Your Bank of America routing number is associated with the location of the bank where you opened your account. Even if you bank at another Bank of America branch, what matters is the bank where you opened your account.

Here are the Bank of America routing numbers by state:

StateRouting Number
Alabama051000017
Alaska051000017
Arizona122101706
Arkansas082000073
California121000358
Colorado123103716
Connecticut011900254
Delaware031202084
District of Columbia054001204
Florida—East063100277 (electronic payment) / 063000047 (paper)
Florida—West063100277
Georgia061000052
Hawaii051000017
Idaho123103716
Illinois—Chicago Metro081904808 (electronic payment) / 071103619 (paper)
Illinois—North071000505
Illinois—South081904808
Indiana071214579
Iowa073000176
Kansas101100045
Kentucky051000017
Louisiana051000017
Maine011200365
Maryland052001633
Massachusetts011000138
Michigan072000805
Minnesota071214579
Mississippi051000017
Missouri East/St. Louis081000032
Missouri West/Kansas City081000032 (electronic) / 101000035 (paper)
Montana051000017
Nebraska051000017
Nevada122400724
New Hampshire011400495
New Jersey021200339
New Mexico107000327
New York021000322
North Carolina053000196
North Dakota051000017
Ohio071214579
Oklahoma103000017
Oregon323070380
Pennsylvania031202084
Rhode Island011500010
South Carolina053904483
South Dakota051000017
Tennessee064000020
Texas—North111000025
Texas—South111000025 (electronic) / 113000023 (paper)
Utah123103716
Vermont051000017
Virginia051000017
Washington125000024
West Virginia051000017
Wisconsin051000017
Wyoming051000017

If you don't see your state listed or are unsure where you opened your account, keep reading.

Breaking Down Your Routing Number
The first four digits pertain to the Federal Reserve. The next four digits are unique to your bank. Consider those the bank's address for the Federal Reserve. The final digit is a mathematical calculation of the first eight digits—it's used to prevent check fraud.

Other Ways to Find Your Bank of America Routing Number

Use a Check
For checking accounts, you can find the routing number in the lower left-hand corner of the checks corresponding with your checking account. It's the first 9 digits located at the bottom of the check.

Go Online
On the Bank of America website, visit the Information and Services tab after logging into your account to find your routing number.

On the mobile app, sign in and select the Accounts Overview tab to select your checking or savings account. Scroll down to the Account Details heading.

Call Customer Service
Call Bank of America at 800.432.1000, Mon–Fri 8 a.m.–11 p.m. ET or Sat–Sun 8 a.m.–8 p.m. ET. After you provide a few specific details to identify yourself, a representative will be able to confirm your account's routing number.

For a savings account routing number, you can check a recent bank statement via your online portal.

Routing Numbers for Domestic/International Wire Transfers

Wire transfers are a faster way to send money than an ACH transfer. From your Bank of America account, you can wire money to other bank accounts, and other accounts can wire funds to you.

For all domestic and international wire transfers using a Bank of America account, the routing number is 026009593.

Domestic Transfers
For all domestic wire transfers using a Bank of America account, the routing number is 026009593.

To SEND a domestic wire transfer, you'll also need:

  • The name and location of the recipient's bank
  • The recipient's account number
  • Recipient bank's wire transfer routing number

International Transfers
For all international wire transfers with a Bank of America account, use the routing number 026009593 and the appropriate Bank of America SWIFT code depending on which currency is being sent:

  • US Dollars: BOFAUS3N
  • Foreign currency: BOFAUS6S
  • Not sure? Use: BOFAUS3N

SWIFT codes are the international equivalents of the US routing numbers. They direct the money to the correct bank for international transfers.

To SEND an international wire, you'll also need:

  • Recipient bank name, address, and country

  • Recipient account number (you may need a country-specific account structure, e.g., a CLABE for Mexico or an IBAN for international bank accounts)

  • Recipient bank's SWIFT code

  • Currency of recipient's account (foreign currency or US dollars)

  • Purpose of wire

Keep reading to learn how to enable your account for wire transfers.

Setting Up Your Account for Wire Transfers

In order to wire funds, you'll need to set up a SafePass account within your Bank of America account. This ensures your transaction will be secure.

Here are the steps to set up your SafePass account:

  1. Sign into online banking portal

  2. Click Profile & Settings

  3. Click Manage SafePass

  4. Select the SafePass device you'd like your secure passcode to be sent

  5. Follow the on-screen instructions

Once you have your SafePass, you can initiate the wire transfer.

  1. Click on Transfers navigation tab in your online banking portal

  2. Select Using account number at another bank

  3. Follow the instructions on the Make Transfer screen

  4. If this is a new recipient, click Add Account/Recipient screen

  5. Enter the required information

Bank of American Wire Transfer Fees
Incoming domestic wire: $15
Incoming international wire: $16
Outbound domestic wire: $30
Outbound international wire sent in foreign currency: $35
Outbound international wire sent in US dollars: $45

Which Bank of America Routing Number Should You Use?

For Any Domestic Money Transfer Activity Besides Wire Transfers:
Use the routing number for the bank where you opened your account.

For Domestic Wire Transfers:
Use the routing number 026009593.

For International Wire Transfers:
Use the routing number 026009593 plus the correct Bank of America SWIFT code.

  • For U.S. dollars, use BOFAUS3N.
  • For foreign currency, use BOFAUS6S
  • If you are unsure which currency you are receiving, use BOFAUS3N.

Is There a Routing Number on Your Debit or Credit Card?
Although your debit card is associated with a bank account, you do not use a routing number for debit card transactions. Routing numbers are only used for transfers directly between bank accounts.

Likewise, credit cards do not have routing numbers since they are not directly linked to any bank account. When you pay your credit card online, you may need to use your bank account routing number to set up the link between your credit card account and checking account, like you would for any other bill.

Bottom Line

You'll likely need your Bank of America routing number when managing your finances. Keep it handy should you need to set up a direct deposit, automatic payment, or wire transfer.

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are author's alone. Please support CreditDonkey on our mission to help you make savvy decisions. Our free online service is made possible through financial relationships with some of the products and services mentioned on this site. We may receive compensation if you shop through links in our content.

Disclaimer: This content was first published on September 29, 2019. Information including rates, fees, terms and benefits may vary, be out of date, or not applicable to you. Information is provided without warranty. Please check the bank's website for updated information.

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Bank of America Review


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