July 25, 2020

Cost of Having a Baby

Read more about Investing

For parents-to-be in the US, the total cost of having a baby is $4,569. Discover more pregnancy and child-rearing statistics.

Having a baby is an extremely rewarding experience. But it'll cost you a pretty penny.

In 2015, the total cost of having a baby was $4,569.

And that's for women with employer-sponsored health insurance.

As with any medical care, the cost of maternal healthcare depends on several different factors - the type of birth you have, your location, and, of course, insurance.

If you're expecting a new bundle of joy, it helps to know what to expect on your bill. Discover what first-year costs to prepare for, including food, clothing, childproofing and more.

Cost of Having a Baby Statistics

  • The average cost of giving birth, for women with insurance, is $4,569.

  • A woman with insurance coverage spends on average $4,314 for a vaginal birth and $5,161 for a cesarean birth.

  • The total standardized cost of maternity healthcare is $29,314.

  • Alabama and Louisiana have among the lowest child-rearing expenses, while Alaska, Massachusetts and New Jersey have the highest.

  • A high-income family spends between $19,380 to $23,380 per year to raise a child.

  • A low-income family spends between $9,330 to $9,980 per year to raise a child.

  • A middle-income family spends between $12,350 to $13,900 per year to raise a child.

  • For a child under 2, a middle-income family spends about $12,680 per year.

  • The estimated cost of raising a child from birth to maturity in a middle-income family is $233,610.

  • USDA estimates a monthly food expense of $133 for children aged 1 up and $283.20 for children aged 9-11.

  • Raising a child is most expensive in the urban Northeast part of the US.

  • More money is spent as a child grows older in all US states.

  • Less money is spent on a child as the family size increases.

  • Housing, food, childcare, and education typically have the biggest budgetary shares in raising a child.

  • Raising a child is about 27% cheaper in rural areas compared to the urban Northeast, mainly due to housing, childcare, and education expenses.

  • The average US hospital admission fees for a c-section delivery is $15,000.

  • The average US hospital admission fees for a regular delivery is $11,200.

  • A middle-income family spends about $750 per year on clothing for a child under 2.

  • A middle-income family spends about $1,580 per year on food for a child under 2.

  • A middle-income family spends about $3,680 per year on housing for a child under 2.

  • A middle-income family spends about $1,790 per year on transportation for a child under 2.

  • A middle-income family spends about $2,870 per year on childcare and education for a child under 2.

  • A middle-income family spends about $1,180 per year on healthcare for a child under 2.

Labor & Delivery Cost Stats

  • The standardized healthcare costs of maternity care in 2015 was $29,314. (Health Affairs, 2020)
  • In 2015, the cost of giving birth for women with insurance in the US was $4,569 on average. (Health Affairs, 2020)
  • In 2015, a woman with insurance coverage would spend on average $4,314 for vaginal birth and $5,161 for cesarean birth. (Health Affairs, 2020)
  • In 2017, the average US hospital admission fees for a c-section delivery is $15,000 . (International Federation of Health Plans, 2019)
  • In 2017, the average US hospital admission fees for a normal delivery is $11,200 . (International Federation of Health Plans, 2019)
  • Alabama and Louisiana offer the lowest birth expenses, while Alaska, Massachusetts and New Jersey offer the highest expenses. (Fair Health, 2017)

Cost of Child-Rearing Stats

  • In 2015, high-income families spent between $19,380 to $23,380 per year to raise a child. (USDA, 2017)
  • In 2015, low-income families spent between $9,330 to $9,980 per year to raise a child. (USDA, 2017)
  • In 2015, middle-income families spent between $12,350 to $13,900 per year to raise a child. (USDA, 2017)
  • In 2015, a middle-income family would spend a total of about $12,680 per year for a child under age 2. (USDA, 2017)
  • In 2015, the estimated cost of raising a child from birth to maturity in a middle-income family was $233,610. (USDA, 2017)
  • Raising a child is most expensive in the Urban Northeast part of the US. (USDA, 2017)
  • More money is spent as a child grows older in all US states. (USDA, 2017)
  • Less money is spent on a child as the family size increases. (USDA, 2017)
  • Housing, food and childcare/education typically have the biggest budgetary shares in raising a child. (USDA, 2017)
  • Raising a child is cheaper by about 27% in rural areas compared to the urban Northeast, mainly due to housing, childcare, and education. (USDA, 2020)

Cost of Food, Clothing, Diapers

  • Infants require up to 12 diapers per day, toddlers about 8. (National Diaper Bank Network, 2019)
  • Infant formula can range from $68 to $243 per month on a baby's first year. (SmartAsset, 2019)
  • Once your baby starts eating solid food, you would spend about $50 to $100 on your baby's food expenses. (BabyCenter, 2020)
  • USDA moderate cost food plan estimates a monthly cost of $133 for children aged 1 up to $283.20 for children aged 9-11. (USDA, 2020)
  • In 2015, a middle-income family would spend about $1,580 per year for the food of a child under age 2. (USDA, 2017)
  • In 2015, a middle-income family would spend about $750 per year for the clothing of a child under age 2. (USDA, 2017)
  • Disposable diapers can cost $70 to $80 per month per baby. (National Diaper Bank Network, 2019)

Cost of Childproofing & Childcare

  • Basic childproofing for an average US home would set you back about $1270. (Fixr, 2020)
  • National average weekly rates in 2019: Nanny $565, after-school $243, child care center $215, family care center $201, au pair $401 (Care.com, 2020)
  • In 2015, a middle-income family would spend about $3,680 per year for the housing of a child under age 2. (USDA, 2017)
  • In 2015, a middle-income family would spend about $1,790 per year for the transportation of a child under age 2. (USDA, 2017)
  • In 2015, a middle-income family would spend about $2,870 per year for the childcare and education of a child under age 2. (USDA, 2017)
  • In 2015, a middle-income family would spend about $1,180 per year for the health care of a child under age 2. (USDA, 2017)

Cost of Childcare Equipment

Pregnancy Rates & Age Stats

  • In the US, the average age of a first-time mom has increased from 24.9 in 2000 to 26.3 in 2014. (CDC, 2016)
  • The average age a woman would bear her first child has increased across all the US states from 2000 to 2014. (CDC, 2016)
  • Larger increases in the common age of a first-time mom between 2000 and 2014 is more apparent in western US. (CDC, 2016)
  • The pregnancy rate of women in the US aged 15 to 44 has declined from 1990 to 2010. (CDC, 2015)
  • The pregnancy rate of women under the age of 30 were lower and higher for women between 30 and 44 years old in 2010 compared with the 1990 figures. (CDC, 2015)

Bottom Line

While the costs of having a child can seem daunting, the process makes it all worth it.

Before expanding your family, get familiar with the average expenses for similar families living in your area. Understand how your new little one may impact weekly grocery costs, insurance, utilities and - don't forget - your nightly shut-eye.

Note: This website is made possible through financial relationships with some of the products and services mentioned on this site. We may receive compensation if you shop through links in our content. You do not have to use our links, but you help support CreditDonkey if you do.

More from CreditDonkey:


Average Cost of Daycare

Infographic: New Moms

New Moms


Life Insurance for New Parents


Investing

Are Robo Advisors a Good Idea

Robo advisors make it possible for new investors to start investing. But they come with a fee. Are they worth it? Read on to learn about the pros and cons.
Leave a comment about Cost of Having a Baby?
Name
Email (won't be published)

Online Budgeting Tools

Looking for the best (and free) online budgeting tool? See how apps like Mint, YNAB, Personal Capital and more compare.

About CreditDonkey®
CreditDonkey is a stock broker comparison website. We publish data-driven analysis to help you save money & make savvy decisions.

Editorial Note: Any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed on this page are those of the author's alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any card issuer.

†Advertiser Disclosure: Many of the offers that appear on this site are from companies from which CreditDonkey receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). CreditDonkey does not include all companies or all offers that may be available in the marketplace.

*See the card issuer's online application for details about terms and conditions. Reasonable efforts are made to maintain accurate information. However, all information is presented without warranty. When you click on the "Apply Now" button you can review the terms and conditions on the card issuer's website.

CreditDonkey does not know your individual circumstances and provides information for general educational purposes only. CreditDonkey is not a substitute for, and should not be used as, professional legal, credit or financial advice. You should consult your own professional advisors for such advice.

About Us | Reviews | Deals | Tips | Privacy | Terms | Contact Us
© 2020 CreditDonkey