September 12, 2018

DISH Network 4K: What You Need to Know

Read more about DISH
This article contains references to products from our partners. We may receive compensation if you apply or shop through links in our content. You help support CreditDonkey by reading our website and using our links. (read more)

4K resolution is the latest trend in TV. Sometimes known as Ultra HD, it refers to programs and TVs that have a higher resolution than High Definition. It has about 4 times the number of pixels onscreen compared to regular HD. This makes for deeper colors and better overall picture quality.

© CreditDonkey

How to Watch 4K

To watch shows in 4K resolution, you need two things: a 4K TV and 4K content.

4K TV sets used to be expensive. However, current prices are quickly falling as the technology improves. You can even find budget TV sets that are 4K-compatible now.

Once you have a 4K TV, that leaves only the other part: 4K content.

While there still isn't much content available, DISH does offer 4K content. There are a few programs available in Ultra HD, both live and on-demand. This includes 4K shows (like Planet Earth II) and live sports. Unlike DIRECTV, you can access DISH's 4K content with any package.

However, most of the 4K content you'll get will be from Netflix (which can be accessed directly from DISH's Hopper menu). The good news is that Netflix delivers a lot of their original content in 4K. You might be able to watch shows like Stranger Things, Narcos, and Altered Carbon in Ultra High Definition (actual content may vary).

To watch 4K shows via DISH, you'll need DISH's Hopper 3 DVR. If you want to watch 4K programming on another 4K TV not connected to the Hopper 3, you'll need to get the 4K Joey receiver. These two are the only boxes which can deliver 4K content.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

  • What is 4K?
    In a nutshell, 4K is simply a sharper, clearer picture. It displays more pixels onscreen, providing more details to the viewer compared to High Definition.

  • What are the exact resolutions of 4K?
    4K refers to one of two high definition resolutions: 3840 x 2160 pixels or 4096 x 2160 pixels. It has four times the pixel resolution of 1080p (1920 x 1080 pixels).

  • Will upgrading to 4K be a huge difference compared to High Definition?
    That depends. While the resolution jump is as big as SD (480p) to HD (1080p), the effects might not be as obvious. For one thing, the SD to HD switch featured an upgrade from old CRT TV sets to newer, flat screen TVs. These newer TVs had a bigger screen size, which made a big difference in viewing experience.

    However, current 4K TV sets feature better resolution—but not bigger screen sizes. Most popular 4K TV models fall in the 40- to 70-inch range.

    You'll only notice the difference if you're watching 4K content on a 4K TV—while sitting close enough. Beyond a certain distance, your eyes can't see the difference between HD and 4K.

  • Does 4K cost extra with DISH?
    In terms of equipment, you'll need to have:

    • A 4K HDR TV
    • Hopper 3 DVR
    • And/or a 4K Joey receiver

    Upgrading your equipment may cost extra, but you can access 4K programming with any of DISH's TV packages. You'll also need a subscription to Netflix, which costs extra.

  • What does DISH have in terms of 4K programming?
    Not much. It does have a few live and on-demand shows, but it doesn't have a dedicated channel like DIRECTV just yet. However, you can access Netflix on the Hopper 3, which is where you'll find most of the 4K content.

Bottom Line

DISH does offer 4K programming, but it's limited to a few live and on-demand shows. You might also be able to catch certain live sports broadcasts in 4K, which is nice if you're a sports fan. However, most of the 4K content will come from Netflix, which you can access via the Hopper 3.

This by itself isn't a reason to upgrade just yet, unless you're looking to replace or buy a new TV. Until 4K becomes the standard, there's no reason to trade your current HD TV set for a new one. For now, it's better to wait until 4K content becomes more accessible before upgrading your TV set.

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are author's alone. Please support CreditDonkey on our mission to help you make savvy decisions. Our free online service is made possible through financial relationships with some of the products and services mentioned on this site. We may receive compensation if you shop through links in our content.

More from CreditDonkey:


Dish TV Reviews


DIRECTV 4K


DirecTV vs Dish

More Articles in Reviews


April
19
2019

HSBC Cash Rewards Mastercard Review

With an unlimited 1.5% cash back and a 10% anniversary bonus, the HSBC Cash Rewards Mastercard is a catchy cash back card. Is it right for you? Read this in-depth review before you apply.
More Articles in Reviews

Next Page:







About CreditDonkey®
CreditDonkey is a tv comparison website. We publish data-driven analysis to help you save money & make savvy decisions.

Editorial Note: Any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed on this page are those of the author's alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any card issuer.

†Advertiser Disclosure: Many of the card offers that appear on this site are from companies from which CreditDonkey receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). CreditDonkey does not include all companies or all offers that may be available in the marketplace.

*See the card issuer's online application for details about terms and conditions. Reasonable efforts are made to maintain accurate information. However, all information is presented without warranty. When you click on the "Apply Now" button you can review the terms and conditions on the card issuer's website.

CreditDonkey does not know your individual circumstances and provides information for general educational purposes only. CreditDonkey is not a substitute for, and should not be used as, professional legal, credit or financial advice. You should consult your own professional advisors for such advice.